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Remove invasive species to give pollinators a boost.

Removing Exotic Ornamentals Gives Pollinators a Boost

Privet was brought to the United States from China to be used as an ornamental shrub on public and private land, roadsides, and forested urban areas. Now, multiplying without bounds, privet competes with local plants for light, nutrients, and water. Researchers believe that privet is now disrupting the native bee populations and other pollinators.  A…

Monarch butterfly fueling up on a common milkweed bloom.

Mexico Bound: Where the Monarchs Roam and Originate

Learning where monarchs migrate within North American may help save the species. Researchers are now looking at where overwintering monarch butterflies originate over multiple years. Although a large percentage of monarchs migrated to Mexico from the Midwest, their origins were spread throughout Canada and other parts of the United States. Conservation efforts now need to be…

Working Lands for Wildlife seek to accelerate conservation.

Monarch Conservation on Agricultural Lands Gets a Boost

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resource Conservation Service and The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have collaborated under Working Lands for Wildlife to accelerate conservation on behalf of the monarch butterfly. For the past two decades, populations of the monarchs have declined significantly across North America due to the eradication of the milkweed plant, the…

Plant wildflowers in clusters so pollinators can find them easily.

Monarch Habitat Helps ALL Pollinators

The flowers and plants in your garden not only look pretty, they have an important job. As the habitat to many creatures, your garden provides the essential nutrients for survival and reproduction. Adult monarchs like to sip nectar from flowers and liquid from some fruits, but their caterpillars or larvae, require food from the milkweed plant…

Protect a prairie near you!

What is better than Ecosystem Restoration? Conservation of Prairies

The Midwestern states, also known as the Corn Belt to the U.S., are a prime breeding ground for monarch butterflies during their migration to Mexico. The milkweed plant that grows in this area serves as the only source of food for the caterpillar during the monarch life cycle. Without milkweed, the monarchs can not reproduce and continue their…

What Are the Different Types of Milkweed?

The monarch butterfly population has declined significantly in the last few decades due to the loss of America's grasslands ecosystems, commercial agricultural practices, and conventional gardening. One of the major reasons for the decline is the shortage of milkweed plants, which is its only caterpillar host plant. Here are a few different types of milkweed native to several different states…

Start Your Milkweed Plants Indoors

Due to illegal logging, herbicides, and climate change, the monarch butterfly population continues to decline at a rapid pace. The milkweed is the only host plant to the caterpillar, and without it, the species can't survive. Planting milkweed in your garden is a great way to help, but did you know you could also plant it indoors?…

Monarchs on the search for water in Mexico overwintering sanctuary.

Monarch Butterflies on the Decline in Mexico

The 2017 count has been released, and the monarch population is down by 27% in Mexico this year. This is devastating news, but unfortunately not a shock, because there has been a downward trend over the past decade and the late winter storm last February took a toll on the population. The dramatic decline over the…

The Life Cycle of a Monarch Butterfly

Monarchs undergo a complete metamorphosis, or change, as they grow. The four distinct stages include the egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Hormones trigger the changes that take place from egg to adult over the course of a month. Adult monarchs live two to six weeks in summer. Those that migrate live all winter, or six to nine…

Walking the Dog Makes a Difference — Dita Rudinow’s Story

Dita Rudinow is doing her part to help make a difference for the monarch butterfly, and it's something we can all do. A recent relocation brought Rudinow to the Seattle area, where she works long hours in advanced technical support for a large telecommunications company. In her spare time, she enjoys taking her dog for a…

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