New Treatments for Migraines

Whether you suffer from migraines yourself or know someone who does, migraines can be serious and debilitating. Migraines are a prevalent neurological disease that affect one billion people worldwide. They tend to run in families and are most common between the ages of 25-55, although children can suffer from migraines too. While most people experience an attack once or twice a month, many have chronic daily migraines, with at least 15 per month.

A migraine is not just a bad headache. It's typically a severe throbbing, recurring pain, usually on one side of the head. Attacks are often accompanied by disabling symptoms such as visual disturbances, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, numbness, and sensitivity to sound, light, and smells. Attacks can last anywhere from a few hours to a few days. 

Migraines are a chronic disease that can diminish the quality of life, causing depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances. There are many treatments available to those who suffer, but not all treatments work for everyone. If you are having difficulty preventing or stopping a migraine in its tracks, you may want to try one of these treatments.

  • Electrical Stimulation Device – Worn like a headband across your forehead, this device directs the flow of electricity to a nerve linked to migraines. It can be used daily, with little to no side effects. Users may feel a massaging or tingling sensation during use.
  • CGRP Inhibitors – calcitonin gene-related peptide is a molecule involved in causing migraine pain. CGRP inhibitors are a class of drugs that block the effects of CGRP. The new medication is self-administered by injection once a month. 
  • Botox – If you suffer from chronic daily migraines, botox shots around your head and neck may help to relieve symptoms. These treatments can be done about every 12 weeks and sessions last about 15 minutes. 
  • Milkweed Balm – Made from all natural GMO-free oils filled with Omega-7 fatty acids, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents, Milkweed Balm soothes muscles topically. Massage where you first feel a migraine and reapply as often as needed until the migraine eases.
  • Mild Anesthesia – SPG nerve block is a simple procedure that numbs a group of nerve cells inside and behind your nose. SPG is linked to your trigeminal nerve, which is involved in migraines.
  • Counseling – From Mindfulness-Based Therapy to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, managing your thoughts, emotions, and body sensations, can help before, during, and after an attack.